Fabrizio and his teacher


Cesare (Morando Morandini, elementary school teacher and a progressive intellectual – to the right) and Fabrizio (Francesco Barilli, his disciple and a controversial mind – to the left) are returning after voting. For people like them voting is a solemn event and our serious friends are ready to continue their political debates. But looking at the still we feel that there is already something wrong between the two intellectuals. Something is separating them. What could have happened?


Fabrizio is obviously going through difficulties, but Cesare, the old friend is, as if, trying to help him to clear – what is bothering his young disciple. Fabrizio, as if, is talking to the… soil, while Cesare is trying to clear Fabrizio’s confusion, to kind of – shake off his young friend’s difficulties.


Being close and frank was the best eye-to-eye, friendly tête-à-tête way of clearing the intellectual difficulties.


But to clear the difficulty through getting rid of it without the problem – like empty space on the asphalt while the whole task is how to resolve it, not how to get rid of it. In other words – the point is how to modify the difficulty, how to transform it and make it more understandable, not to make it empty. And here in this shot we can see Cesare-the old Fabrizio’s friend as anxious as we see him here with his back to us when he is trying with all his attempts to console his young friend with his attempts to help him to clear his confusion.


Now the situation is as problematic as before, although our intellectual friends are as far from one another while sitting across one another on a long spacious public bench.

Aunt Gina’s Beauty, Laziness and Tragedy


Aunt Gina (Adriana Asti) doesn’t like to play cards – she likes to look at her own photos or illustrations in journals. Besides, she takes a special liking of her nephew Fabrizio. And sometimes they allow themselves to gently touch each other. Why not? Nobody expected anything. They knew one another. And they played “bodies” and bodily “each-otherness”.


Gina knew that Fabrizio was alone and that he was losing himself having touched her. She also understood that he is fixated on her, but that mainly he was a kind of revolutionary and has his mentor (Cesare). Finally she and Fabrizio both met with Cesare, who was an interesting but “too serious of a person”.


Gina lets Fabrizio to be the “intellectual” that he is and as a man he allows himself to be. But recently Fabrizio became in strange controversial confusion. He started to take distance from his teacher Cesare. Gina knows that without Cesare Fabrizio cannot even exist, and started to understand that she herself becoming is all alone…


Fabrizio was losing Cesare more and more, he felt more and more disappointment, and step by step started to change his direction.

Separation with its torments but also with some smiles


Before Fabrizio Gina had the younger brother. And her discovery was that to care emotionally for the younger was more intense and rewarding than caring about Fabrizio the older one.


Another discovery, this time about Fabrizio himself was that when after meeting him they said “goodbye” Gina noticed that she was smiling. Something like this never happened to her before.


Gina and Fabrizio found themselves at the opera, but the opera for Italian aristocracy was aristocratic ritual – music of ritualistic life. They are meeting by chance, but also by desire.


Both, Gina and Fabrizio tried and simultaneously didn’t try to find themselves in the solemn hallways and corridors of the opera house. Fabrizio was standing before a giant corridor window, while Gina was solemnly lit by a similar window from another side. This light was light of freedom and otherness – but freedom of the already inevitable otherness.


In their last meeting Gina asks Fabrizio to leave her – she already knew (wasn’t hard to figure out) that Fabrizio and… yes – beautiful and rich Clelia will soon be married. Gina was like a little girl asking for…forgiveness. The masculine pride silently departed.


In their last meeting Gina seriously and modestly asked Fabrizio not to see her anymore. Feelings of a realized love is as difficult in front of love’s suffering and in love’s disappearing. Look at the intensity of Gina’s eye. It’s, as if, intense love for Fabrizio’s future will be singularly directed towards his very future.

Viva, marriage!


Clelia and Fabrizio, as if, forever keeping their strong and heavily symbolic gesture of unity. But it’s not Clelia and Fabrizio’s gestures, but Fabrizio’s strong gesture of possessing the gesture of a gentle and passive wife. Look at her hand, it’s as if, smashed while gently being squeeze by Fabrizio’s powerful right hand.


Fabrizio and Clelia in the opera box at the gallery of the theater. Clelia is looking ahead, to the future, while Fabrizio is looking down at the people who know them and are known by them.


Fabrizio is looking at Clelia’s impeccable profile by his, as if, disappearing eyes, disappearing like the light of a candle silently disappearing, like eyes which are looking but don’t see.


It’s not just Clelia’s eyes that are shining, but, as if, the whole world that is providing light to her happiness. Her mother’s eyes and smile dominate Fabrizio who is, as if, smashed by exhaustion and is barely keeping himself standing against the wall, as if, his legs are giving up. Love seizes and squeezes strongly. Love is keeping itself solidly. But beside seizing and squeezing love is, itself weak. It’s changeable.