Ideological Superstitions and Political Misperceptions in the 20th-21st Centuries (a sociological, psychological and culturological study), 2009

by Victor Enyutin

  • Preface
  • Introduction: neo-conservative incisors of corporate central planning
  • Part I. Political twisting and jerking
    • Introduction: The principle of misjudgment as an engine of international politics
    • Ch. 1. The International story: how USAmericans and Soviet and post-Soviet Russians (SRussians and post-SRussians) systematically misinterpret each other
    • Ch. 2. The American story: how liberals and liberal politicians have lost democracy
    • Ch. 3. The Russian story: how communist bosses became disappointed in Marxist schemes and humanistic phraseology
  • Part II. Some patterns of ideological superstitions and politico-economic prejudices
    • Introduction: On the wings of the angel (elevation of self-image as levitation)
    • Ch. 4. We-are-the-chosen: pop-Judaism
    • Ch. 5. We-are-the-rightest: pop-Christianity
    • Ch. 6. Supplements to “We-are-the-rightest: pop-Christianity”
    • Ch. 7. We-are-the-wisest: pop-spirituality
    • Ch. 8. We-are-the-first: Marxism’s “inevitable laws of history” are on “our” side
    • Ch. 9. We-are-the-richest: from monking to buysumption, from buysumption to monking
    • Ch. 10. We-are-the-marketiest: “free market” as monopoly
    • Ch. 11. We-are-the-best: The Third Reich’s incarnation of Western colonial history
    • Ch. 12. We-are-the-strongest: USAmerica possesses the Holy Grail of technological superiority
    • Ch. 13. We-are-the-superior: USAmerican liberalism with a neo-conservative hernia
  • Part III. The social-psychological background of ideological superstitions and politico-economic prejudices
    • Introduction: Psychological defenses against otherness
    • Ch. 14. The violence of death and the condemnation of mortality as visceral metaphors of otherness
    • Ch. 15. Suspicion and animosity toward cultural and behavioral otherness in Soviet Union and USA
    • Ch. 16. Pluralistic versus hierarchical individualism
    • Ch. 17. Orientation on similarity as a principle of the community’s unification and harmonization
    • Ch. 18. The tandem of self-/group-aggrandizement and scapegoating of dissimilar others (DOs) as the basic totalitarian behavioral archetype
    • Ch. 19. Post-democratic socio-political power versus historical consciousness
    • Ch. 20. The absence of difference between the subject of annunciation and the subject of annunciated in propaganda and advertising
    • Ch. 21. Technical-analytical thinking as a psychological symptom
    • Ch. 22. The paradox of impulsive calculation
    • Ch. 23. Utopian impatience
    • Ch. 24. Human beings as professionals
    • Ch. 25. Personal morality versus systemic determination of human behavior: types of social mega-organisms
    • Ch. 26. The elimination of humanistic knowledge: technical science is for the decision makers, while religion, patriotic ideology and pop-entertainment are for the masses
    • Ch. 27. Prejudice as a psychotherapist
    • Ch. 28. How to avoid the symmetrical traps of “acting before thinking” and of “thinking instead of acting”
    • Ch. 29. Staging immortality: military rituals of honoring the fallen, and Cindy Sheehan
    • Ch. 30. The three smiles of a liberally inclined person trapped in the Bushmerican situation
  • Part IV. Further elaborations
    • Introduction: Heavenly contempt toward Earthly life
    • Ch. 31. Self-doubt as the basis of moral action
    • Ch. 32. The trans-historical species of nomadic warriors — with money as their new high-tech weapon
    • Ch. 33. It happens like this …
    • Ch. 34. The six-part archetype of the cheerful readiness for war
    • Ch. 35. Fantasy, reality, and money
    • Ch. 36. Conservatives, liberals, liber-servatives
    • Ch. 37. Power or truth, command or (reasoned) argument, fist or word
    • Ch. 38. Between fragment and wholeness
  • Afterward: Americans and Russians and everybody – Amerussians, Russmericans, Amerusseverybody
  • Notes
  • Glossary
  • Abbreviations

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Victor Enyutin is a Russian-born American writer living in USA since 1974. He became an American citizen in 1992.

Ideological Superstitions is the author’s 12th book. His other books include

  • Ricochet (short stories, 1981)
  • Five Cycles (poems, 1983)
  • Poems: to Composers, Painters and Film-directors (1984)
  • Constructions with Flesh (poems, 1985)
  • Condensations (poems, 1986)
  • Crib Notes (poems, 1989)
  • Manoveniia (poems, 1997)
  • The 16th Republic of USSR: On Soviet Emigration to the West (study of totalitarian psychology, 1982)
  • The Dionysus Injured (novel, 1990)
  • The Decline of the American Democracy (essays, 1999)
  • Notes on Russian-Language Poetry (etudes and essays, 1998)